Claudia Crivellari

Claudia Crivellari

I started studying ballet at the age of 7, but I always felt that dancing was something more natural and instinctive that we all share. something more natural and instinctive that everyone could share.
For this reason, as I grew up I tried to experiment with various styles of dance, especially contemporary dance. contemporary dance.
Although I did not immediately have the support of my family, I still managed to make dance my job. dance my job. First as a professional dancer and now as a teacher.
In 2012 I had an injury that made it very difficult for me to walk for a long time. a long time. At that moment I thought I would never be able to dance again. I was very sad because I was living my dream as a dancer. It took me some time to fully recover from that injury and this experience led me this experience made me look at things differently.
In 2015 I decided to take part in the DanceAbility teachers’ course: I didn’t know anything until then, but when I I didn’t know anything about it until then, but when I read what it was about I was very curious and I saw in this course a possibility of a future job other than being a dancer.
So, I got to experience a dance method made to include ALL people within the class.
This experience was so important and strong that it gave me the desire to propagate the DanceAbility method to give everyone the possibility to communicate through movement and dance.
I have always loved to dance, but after that course my view of dance had totally changed.
When I started working as a DanceAbility teacher, I came into contact with different disabilities.
Initially, I taught in a day centre with people with medium to severe physical and mental disabilities.
In those 3 months of the project I realised that often the biggest limits were not in the disabled people (DanceAbility disabled people (DanceAbility fully teaches you how to work in all circumstances), but in “normal” people.
The biggest difficulty I always find is in the minds of the people in the minds of people who work with disabilities.
Obviously these limitations are not intentional, but linked to a very strong cultural heritage. An example example was a person with a severe disability who did not speak and only moved his eyes.
I was there to teach a dance to include everyone, but initially the operators were the first to exclude that person convinced that person convinced that he would not be able to participate. I had to fight a little bit, but slowly
I had to fight a bit, but slowly I managed to show that the reality was different. The person in question participated in the project lessons and that was a real victory.
Another great victory was bringing DanceAbility to everyone.
Often the message goes out that this method is just for making disabled people dance. Once again Once again, a great exclusion.
With the project organised with Uildm, it was possible to have lessons and put on a show where people of different ethnicities, different ages, disabled and able-bodied, danced together.
It was an experience full of joy and growth for everyone in the group.
The next step I would like to take is to break down the walls that are often created between academic dance and DanceAbility. Physical stereotypes often block the possibility of disabled people being able to dance professionally. dance companies with disabled people around the world, but in Italy this is still a long way off.

By approaching disability I was able to see the world from other perspectives.
At the level of personal growth it has certainly given me the possibility to be more empathetic and resilient. resilient. It has given me the opportunity to live life more fully. But the most beautiful thing But what’s even nicer is that I’ve had the chance to meet wonderful people and realise more and more that in the end we are all a bit “disabled”. and realising more and more that in the end we are all a bit ‘disabled’ or ‘able-bodied’. It all starts with our mind and where we where we decide to look.